Coconut, Passionfruit, Ginger & Mint Tube Dessert

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By Darren Purchese

An absolute classic dessert from Burch & Purchese Sweet Studio. This flavour combination was inspired by a dessert that we ate in a restaurant in Spain in 2009. There was a combo of coconut, passionfruit & mint and it was so delicious that when we returned to Melbourne to open B&P we worked on this flavour combination with ginger added and turned it into a cake and dessert. This dessert was on the menu for the entire 12 year life of the business. Here for the first time is the recipe we used at the time, scaled back for domestic purposes. Use a decorative glass to serve this in at home and plan your recipe as it would be better to make components over a number of days as it is a bit of a workload!

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72

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SALTED OAT & GINGER CRUMB

225g unsalted butter, cold melted
150g plain flour
150g rolled oats
200g soft light brown sugar
1tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 pinch salt
15g ground ginger

PASSIONFRUIT CURD

75 ml passionfruit juice, fresh, seeds sieved out
165g eggs, whole beaten (approx. 3 large eggs)
150g caster sugar
100g unsalted butter, softened
3g gelatine leaves

COCONUT CAVAIR

60g sago pearls
320g UHT coconut cream, (Kara brand)
65g sugar syrup 1-1

PASSIONFRUIT JELLY

150 ml passionfruit juice, fresh, seeds sieved out
50 ml sugar syrup 1-1
5.6g gelatine leaves
1g agar

MINT JELLY

50g sugar syrup 1-1
1.1g agar
7g gelatine leaves
200 ml water
1 drop mint oil/essence

COCONUT MOUSSE

100g caster sugar
2g pectin powder
160g UHT coconut cream, (Kara brand)
40g egg yolks, (approx. 2 large egg yolks)
4g gelatine leaves
275 ml cream, thickened

GINGER MARSHMALLOW

40g water
25g caster sugar
75g dextrose powder
50g glucose syrup
60g egg white (approx. 2 large egg whites)
6g gelatine leaves
5g ground ginger
 q.s. water soluble yellow food colour

WHITE CHOCOLATE VELVET SPRAY MIX

300g white chocolate
200g cocoa butter

GREEN LIQUID CHOCOLATE FLICK

100g white chocolate
200g cocoa butter
 q.s. oil soluble green food colour

WHITE CHOCOLATE MINT SQUARE DECORATION

 q.s. green chocolate liquid chocolate (see above)
1 drop mint oli/essence
200g tempered white chocolate
1

For the salted oat & ginger crumble… place the plain flour, rolled oats, soft light brown sugar, bicarbonate of soda, salt and ground ginger into a mixing bowl and mix well with your fingers. Add the melted butter and mix well to form a crumble. Sprinkle the crumb in irregular shapes onto a baking tray lined with baked paper and bake in an oven preheated to 180C - bake fro 10-15 minutes or until the crumb is golden brown and evenly baked. Leave to cool before transferring into a tin or sealed container until use. This will have a shelf life cooked for up to a week.

 

2

For the passionfruit curd… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside. In a medium bowl, combine the passionfruit juice, zest, eggs, sugar, and butter and use a stick blender to process together until just combined. Place the bowl over a saucepan of simmering water. Ensure the bottom of the bowl does not touch the water. Cook the curd, whisking constantly with a hand whisk, until the mixture reaches 82C. Use a thermometer to accurately check the temperature. Remove the bowl from the heat and add the soaked gelatine to the bowl, stir the gelatine through with a heat proof spatula until dissolved. Strain the curd through a sieve into a clean medium bowl set over a larger bowl filled with ice. Stir until cool enough to refrigerate until needed. This product will have a shelf life of three to four days from making as long as it is refrigerated.

 

3

For the coconut caviar… Place 1 litre of water into a large saucepan and turn the temperature to high. Bring the water to a rapid boil; this is very important in the cooking of the sago. Rein the sago pearls into the boiling water and give it a quick stir to make sure that no pearls have stuck to the base of the pan. Cook the sago for around 10 minutes; the sago starts off completely white and becomes translucent when cooked through. Remove to sago with a small fine sieve when the smallest white dot can be seen in the near translucent sago pearls. Place the cooked sago into a container with the coconut cream and the sugar syrup and stir for a few minutes to accelerate the cooling process and prevent sticking. Store the sago in the fridge for a couple of hours before use to let the starches set and for the mix to become thicker. Transfer to a container and refrigerate until needed. This product has a very short shelf life of only a couple of days refrigerated.

 

4

For the passionfruit jelly… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside. Mix the syrup with the passionfruit and pour the solution into a small saucepan, add the agar and gently heat to a boil. Stir constantly to prevent it catching. Remove from the heat and add in the soaked gelatine, stir to melt. The jelly is now ready to use immediately. Pour it into 2 cm diameter silicone hemisphere moulds and leave to set before freezing hard for at least four hours or preferably overnight. Once frozen, demould the jellies and store them in a container in the freezer until needed.

 

5

For the mint jelly… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside. Place the water and syrup along with the agar into a saucepan and start to heat over a medium setting. Bring the solution to a boil and remove the pan from the heat. Add the gelatine and stir well to dissolve before adding the mint flavour and stirring well again. Taste the jelly to ensure that there is enough mint flavour and add more essential oil if needed. Strain the jelly through a sieve. The jelly is now ready to use immediately. Pour it into 2 cm diameter silicone hemisphere moulds and leave to set before freezing hard for at least four hours or preferably overnight. Once frozen, demould the jellies and store them in a container in the freezer until needed.

 

6

For the ginger marshmallow… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside. Place the water, sugar and dextrose into a small saucepan and set onto a medium heat. Bring the syrup to a gentle boil and remove the pan from the heat. Add the glucose syrup and place back onto the heat. Place the egg whites into a mixing bowl and whisk on high speed. Once the syrup reaches 118°C remove the pan from the heat again and string the hot syrup into the fast whisking egg whites. Leave to whisk on the highest setting for 1 minute and then drop in the soaked gelatine. Continue to whisk the mixture for a further four minutes and then turn off the machine. Using a rubber spatula, fold in the ginger powder and colour. Place the marshmallow mix into a piping bag fitted with a large plain nozzle. Pipe bulbs of marshmallow onto a tray lightly greased with canola spray.

 

7

For the coconut mousse - soak gelatine… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside.

 

8

For the coconut mousse - make mousse base… mix the 20 g of the caster sugar with the pectin and add to the coconut cream in a small saucepan. Place the pan over a medium heat and stir until boiling point. Remove the pan from the heat and leave aside for 10 minutes. Place the remaining 80 g of caster sugar into a small mixing bowl and add the egg yolks, mix well with a whisk for 30 seconds and then pour the mixture into the saucepan of cooling coconut. Place the pan back onto the stove and turn the heat onto low. Stir the mix constantly while cooking and bring the temperature to 85°C. Remove the pan from the heat and add the soaked gelatine. Stir well with a spatula for to ensure that the gelatine has dissolved and then strain the mixture through a sieve into a mixing bowl and leave to one side. Whisk the cream to semi whipped and leave to one side.

 

9

For the coconut mousse - to finish… stir the coconut base regularly to prevent it from gelatinising and once the temperature drops to 35°C - 40°C pour one third of this mixture into the whipped cream. Fold this mixture gently ensuring all is incorporated well and transfer this mix into the bowl with the remaining cream. Fold all of this again gently ensuring that you have a light homogeneous mass, the mousse is now ready to be set into moulds.

 

10

For the coconut mousse - to set into moulds… for our Coconut, Ginger, Passionfruit & Mint dessert you require silicone hemisphere moulds with a diameter of 4 cm. Pour or pipe the mousse mixture into these moulds and place the mat into the freezer to set hard. This should take at least four hours but overnight is preferable. Any remaining mousse you have over can be poured into bowls or glasses and set in the fridge. Garnish as desired and serve for dessert.

 

11

For the coconut mousse - demould… once the mousse domes have set hard remove them from the mould and transfer them to the fridge on a small wire rack ready for chocolate spraying.

 

12

For chocolate spraying… The finish on a cake or dessert after it has been sprayed with a light; delicious mist of liquid chocolate is absolutely stunning. Some of our dishes have a component which has been sprayed in chocolate; the beading and textured finish is down to the liquid chocolate cooling in the air and on contact with the cold surface of the product. Chocolate on its own is too thick for spraying so it has to be thinned with cocoa butter to ensure it feeds through the gun, this is a simple exercise and cocoa butter is readily available now in specialist food stores. We use these thinned chocolate mixes to add another textural element to our cakes by flicking the mix with a spoon onto the sprayed product.

 

13

For chocolate spraying - equipment… there are some very fancy and expensive chocolate spraying systems available today however a simple electric paint spraying gun from a hardware store will do the trick just fine. I use a Wagner paint-spraying gun and have four one for dark chocolate, one for milk chocolate, one for white chocolate and one for caramelised white chocolate. I buy them new and use them only for food purposes after a thorough initial sterilisation of the parts. Chocolate spraying can be a messy business as fine mists of spray can literally go everywhere so it is important to spray in a contained area. Try wrapping work surfaces or walls with baking paper and place the cake or component in an upturned box, which will catch most of the spray mix that missed the final product.

 

14

For chocolate spraying tips… place the mousse cake or component at least 30 cm away from the gun and spray in a continuous left to right motion turning the product as you go until all sides and surfaces are covered evenly. Ensure the spray mix in the gun is at a temperature of around 35°C - 40°C, which is warm enough for it not to congeal in the gun but cool enough for it to bead and give a textured effect on the product. Always spray mousses that have been thawed in a fridge for two hours. A little firmness will yield the best textured finish but the product cannot be too frozen or the spray mix will not adhere to the mousse.

For the white chocolate spray mix… melt the chocolate to a temperature of 45°C and separately melt the cocoa butter to a temperature of 50°C. Mix the two together into a clean bowl stirring well with a silicone spatula. Once the two liquids have been combined pass the solution through a fine sieve into a jug. Fill the canister of your spray gun to ¾ of the capacity and attach the canister to the gun. Remove the semi frozen coconut domes from the fridge and spray.

 

15

For the white chocolate spray mix… melt the chocolate to a temperature of 45°C and separately melt the cocoa butter to a temperature of 50°C. Mix the two together into a clean bowl stirring well with a silicone spatula. Once the two liquids have been combined pass the solution through a fine sieve into a jug. Fill the canister of your spray gun to ¾ of the capacity and attach the canister to the gun. Remove the semi frozen coconut mousses domes from the fridge and spray.

 

16

For the green chocolate flick… melt the chocolate to a temperature of 45°C and separately melt the cocoa butter to a temperature of 50°C. Place the melted liquids into an electric blender and mix together well on a medium speed setting. Add the oil soluble food colour powder and blend with a hand held blender. Continue to blend well for a further 2 minutes. Pass the solution through a fine sieve into a jug. Use a spoon to decoratively flick the mix minimally onto the edge of the sprayed product.

 

17

For the white chocolate mint decoration… check the temperature of your melted green chocolate flick. When it has dropped to a temperature of 30C you can use a pastry brush to brush the green chocolate onto an acetate sheet. As it just sets quickly pour the tempered white chocolate (with the mint already added) onto the acetate sheet and use a palette knife to spread the chocolate out to a thickness of 1-2 mm. Ensure the chocolate has an even thickness and wait for one minute for the crystallisation to occur. Once the chocolate is set to the touch use a metal ruler and a scalpel to cut the chocolate into 2-3 cm X 2-3 cm square pieces. Turn the sheet of acetate chocolate side down onto another sheet of acetate and rest a cold baking tray or similar on top. This will prevent the chocolate from starting to curl upwards as it fully crystallises. Leave the chocolate for 1 hour at a room temperature of no higher than 22°C. Remove the tray and peel the acetate carefully from the chocolate. Store the chocolate squares in a sealed container in a cool dry place until ready to use.

 

18

To assemble the dessert… take four tall narrow tubes or glasses to serve the dessert in. Add 45 g of salted oat & ginger crumb to each glass. Spoon or pipe 45 g of passionfruit curd on top of the crumble. Spoon 45 g of coconut caviar on top of the curd. Push a frozen mint jelly dome into the sago. Add a sprayed coconut mousse dome on top of the jelly. Add a frozen passionfruit jelly dome to the side of the coconut mousse. Finish each dessert with a bulb of ginger marshmallow and a square of mint white chocolate.

 

1
0 hours 0 minutes

For the salted oat & ginger crumble… place the plain flour, rolled oats, soft light brown sugar, bicarbonate of soda, salt and ground ginger into a mixing bowl and mix well with your fingers. Add the melted butter and mix well to form a crumble. Sprinkle the crumb in irregular shapes onto a baking tray lined with baked paper and bake in an oven preheated to 180C - bake fro 10-15 minutes or until the crumb is golden brown and evenly baked. Leave to cool before transferring into a tin or sealed container until use. This will have a shelf life cooked for up to a week.

2
0 hours 0 minutes

For the passionfruit curd… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside. In a medium bowl, combine the passionfruit juice, zest, eggs, sugar, and butter and use a stick blender to process together until just combined. Place the bowl over a saucepan of simmering water. Ensure the bottom of the bowl does not touch the water. Cook the curd, whisking constantly with a hand whisk, until the mixture reaches 82C. Use a thermometer to accurately check the temperature. Remove the bowl from the heat and add the soaked gelatine to the bowl, stir the gelatine through with a heat proof spatula until dissolved. Strain the curd through a sieve into a clean medium bowl set over a larger bowl filled with ice. Stir until cool enough to refrigerate until needed. This product will have a shelf life of three to four days from making as long as it is refrigerated.

3
0 hours 0 minutes

For the coconut caviar… Place 1 litre of water into a large saucepan and turn the temperature to high. Bring the water to a rapid boil; this is very important in the cooking of the sago. Rein the sago pearls into the boiling water and give it a quick stir to make sure that no pearls have stuck to the base of the pan. Cook the sago for around 10 minutes; the sago starts off completely white and becomes translucent when cooked through. Remove to sago with a small fine sieve when the smallest white dot can be seen in the near translucent sago pearls. Place the cooked sago into a container with the coconut cream and the sugar syrup and stir for a few minutes to accelerate the cooling process and prevent sticking. Store the sago in the fridge for a couple of hours before use to let the starches set and for the mix to become thicker. Transfer to a container and refrigerate until needed. This product has a very short shelf life of only a couple of days refrigerated.

4
0 hours 0 minutes

For the passionfruit jelly… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside. Mix the syrup with the passionfruit and pour the solution into a small saucepan, add the agar and gently heat to a boil. Stir constantly to prevent it catching. Remove from the heat and add in the soaked gelatine, stir to melt. The jelly is now ready to use immediately. Pour it into 2 cm diameter silicone hemisphere moulds and leave to set before freezing hard for at least four hours or preferably overnight. Once frozen, demould the jellies and store them in a container in the freezer until needed.

5
0 hours 0 minutes

For the mint jelly… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside. Place the water and syrup along with the agar into a saucepan and start to heat over a medium setting. Bring the solution to a boil and remove the pan from the heat. Add the gelatine and stir well to dissolve before adding the mint flavour and stirring well again. Taste the jelly to ensure that there is enough mint flavour and add more essential oil if needed. Strain the jelly through a sieve. The jelly is now ready to use immediately. Pour it into 2 cm diameter silicone hemisphere moulds and leave to set before freezing hard for at least four hours or preferably overnight. Once frozen, demould the jellies and store them in a container in the freezer until needed.

6
0 hours 0 minutes

For the ginger marshmallow… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside. Place the water, sugar and dextrose into a small saucepan and set onto a medium heat. Bring the syrup to a gentle boil and remove the pan from the heat. Add the glucose syrup and place back onto the heat. Place the egg whites into a mixing bowl and whisk on high speed. Once the syrup reaches 118°C remove the pan from the heat again and string the hot syrup into the fast whisking egg whites. Leave to whisk on the highest setting for 1 minute and then drop in the soaked gelatine. Continue to whisk the mixture for a further four minutes and then turn off the machine. Using a rubber spatula, fold in the ginger powder and colour. Place the marshmallow mix into a piping bag fitted with a large plain nozzle. Pipe bulbs of marshmallow onto a tray lightly greased with canola spray.

7
0 hours 0 minutes

For the coconut mousse - soak gelatine… soak the gelatine leaves in iced cold water for a few minutes to soften, drain and discard the water and squeeze the excess from the soaked gelatine. Set the soaked gelatine aside.

8
0 hours 0 minutes

For the coconut mousse - make mousse base… mix the 20 g of the caster sugar with the pectin and add to the coconut cream in a small saucepan. Place the pan over a medium heat and stir until boiling point. Remove the pan from the heat and leave aside for 10 minutes. Place the remaining 80 g of caster sugar into a small mixing bowl and add the egg yolks, mix well with a whisk for 30 seconds and then pour the mixture into the saucepan of cooling coconut. Place the pan back onto the stove and turn the heat onto low. Stir the mix constantly while cooking and bring the temperature to 85°C. Remove the pan from the heat and add the soaked gelatine. Stir well with a spatula for to ensure that the gelatine has dissolved and then strain the mixture through a sieve into a mixing bowl and leave to one side. Whisk the cream to semi whipped and leave to one side.

9
0 hours 0 minutes

For the coconut mousse - to finish… stir the coconut base regularly to prevent it from gelatinising and once the temperature drops to 35°C - 40°C pour one third of this mixture into the whipped cream. Fold this mixture gently ensuring all is incorporated well and transfer this mix into the bowl with the remaining cream. Fold all of this again gently ensuring that you have a light homogeneous mass, the mousse is now ready to be set into moulds.

10
0 hours 0 minutes

For the coconut mousse - to set into moulds… for our Coconut, Ginger, Passionfruit & Mint dessert you require silicone hemisphere moulds with a diameter of 4 cm. Pour or pipe the mousse mixture into these moulds and place the mat into the freezer to set hard. This should take at least four hours but overnight is preferable. Any remaining mousse you have over can be poured into bowls or glasses and set in the fridge. Garnish as desired and serve for dessert.

11
0 hours 0 minutes

For the coconut mousse - demould… once the mousse domes have set hard remove them from the mould and transfer them to the fridge on a small wire rack ready for chocolate spraying.

12
0 hours 0 minutes

For chocolate spraying… The finish on a cake or dessert after it has been sprayed with a light; delicious mist of liquid chocolate is absolutely stunning. Some of our dishes have a component which has been sprayed in chocolate; the beading and textured finish is down to the liquid chocolate cooling in the air and on contact with the cold surface of the product. Chocolate on its own is too thick for spraying so it has to be thinned with cocoa butter to ensure it feeds through the gun, this is a simple exercise and cocoa butter is readily available now in specialist food stores. We use these thinned chocolate mixes to add another textural element to our cakes by flicking the mix with a spoon onto the sprayed product.

13
0 hours 0 minutes

For chocolate spraying - equipment… there are some very fancy and expensive chocolate spraying systems available today however a simple electric paint spraying gun from a hardware store will do the trick just fine. I use a Wagner paint-spraying gun and have four one for dark chocolate, one for milk chocolate, one for white chocolate and one for caramelised white chocolate. I buy them new and use them only for food purposes after a thorough initial sterilisation of the parts. Chocolate spraying can be a messy business as fine mists of spray can literally go everywhere so it is important to spray in a contained area. Try wrapping work surfaces or walls with baking paper and place the cake or component in an upturned box, which will catch most of the spray mix that missed the final product.

14
0 hours 0 minutes

For chocolate spraying tips… place the mousse cake or component at least 30 cm away from the gun and spray in a continuous left to right motion turning the product as you go until all sides and surfaces are covered evenly. Ensure the spray mix in the gun is at a temperature of around 35°C - 40°C, which is warm enough for it not to congeal in the gun but cool enough for it to bead and give a textured effect on the product. Always spray mousses that have been thawed in a fridge for two hours. A little firmness will yield the best textured finish but the product cannot be too frozen or the spray mix will not adhere to the mousse.

For the white chocolate spray mix… melt the chocolate to a temperature of 45°C and separately melt the cocoa butter to a temperature of 50°C. Mix the two together into a clean bowl stirring well with a silicone spatula. Once the two liquids have been combined pass the solution through a fine sieve into a jug. Fill the canister of your spray gun to ¾ of the capacity and attach the canister to the gun. Remove the semi frozen coconut domes from the fridge and spray.

15
0 hours 0 minutes

For the white chocolate spray mix… melt the chocolate to a temperature of 45°C and separately melt the cocoa butter to a temperature of 50°C. Mix the two together into a clean bowl stirring well with a silicone spatula. Once the two liquids have been combined pass the solution through a fine sieve into a jug. Fill the canister of your spray gun to ¾ of the capacity and attach the canister to the gun. Remove the semi frozen coconut mousses domes from the fridge and spray.

16
0 hours 0 minutes

For the green chocolate flick… melt the chocolate to a temperature of 45°C and separately melt the cocoa butter to a temperature of 50°C. Place the melted liquids into an electric blender and mix together well on a medium speed setting. Add the oil soluble food colour powder and blend with a hand held blender. Continue to blend well for a further 2 minutes. Pass the solution through a fine sieve into a jug. Use a spoon to decoratively flick the mix minimally onto the edge of the sprayed product.

17
0 hours 0 minutes

For the white chocolate mint decoration… check the temperature of your melted green chocolate flick. When it has dropped to a temperature of 30C you can use a pastry brush to brush the green chocolate onto an acetate sheet. As it just sets quickly pour the tempered white chocolate (with the mint already added) onto the acetate sheet and use a palette knife to spread the chocolate out to a thickness of 1-2 mm. Ensure the chocolate has an even thickness and wait for one minute for the crystallisation to occur. Once the chocolate is set to the touch use a metal ruler and a scalpel to cut the chocolate into 2-3 cm X 2-3 cm square pieces. Turn the sheet of acetate chocolate side down onto another sheet of acetate and rest a cold baking tray or similar on top. This will prevent the chocolate from starting to curl upwards as it fully crystallises. Leave the chocolate for 1 hour at a room temperature of no higher than 22°C. Remove the tray and peel the acetate carefully from the chocolate. Store the chocolate squares in a sealed container in a cool dry place until ready to use.

18
0 hours 0 minutes

To assemble the dessert… take four tall narrow tubes or glasses to serve the dessert in. Add 45 g of salted oat & ginger crumb to each glass. Spoon or pipe 45 g of passionfruit curd on top of the crumble. Spoon 45 g of coconut caviar on top of the curd. Push a frozen mint jelly dome into the sago. Add a sprayed coconut mousse dome on top of the jelly. Add a frozen passionfruit jelly dome to the side of the coconut mousse. Finish each dessert with a bulb of ginger marshmallow and a square of mint white chocolate.