Red Coloured White Chocolate Squares

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By Darren Purchese

You will need to temper and then colour white chocolate to red. Use an oil soluble food colour to disperse efficiently into chocolate.

Tempering is the process of heating and cooling chocolate to a specific temperature to ensure that it has a smooth texture, glossy finish, and a crisp snap when broken.

Here's a method for tempering white chocolate with a double boiler.

Time

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0

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Degree of Difficulty

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MATERIALS

500g white chocolate, buttons or coarse chopped
 red food colour, oil soluble (as needed)
 microwavable, heat proof bowl
 pot or saucepan
 digital thermometer
 spatula
 acetate sheet
 small paring knife
 offset spatula or palette knife
1

Begin by setting up a double boiler. Fill a pot or saucepan with a few inches of water and bring it to a simmer over medium heat.

Place the heat-proof bowl on top of the pot, making sure that the bottom of the bowl does not touch the water. Add the chopped white chocolate to the bowl and stir gently with a spatula until the chocolate is melted and smooth.

Remove the bowl from the pot and dry the bottom with a kitchen towel. Take the temperature of the chocolate with a candy thermometer and record the temperature.

To begin tempering, you will need to cool the chocolate. You can do this by adding 1/3 of unmelted white chocolate to the melted chocolate and stirring until it has melted. Repeat this process twice, adding more unmelted white chocolate each time, until the chocolate has cooled to around 80°F (27°C).

Now it's time to warm the chocolate back up to its working temperature. Place the bowl back over the simmering water and heat the chocolate to around 86°F (30°C), stirring frequently with the spatula. Be careful not to let the temperature go above 91°F (33°C), or the chocolate will lose its temper.

Once the chocolate has reached its working temperature, remove the bowl from the heat and wipe the bottom of the bowl with a kitchen towel to prevent any water droplets from getting into the chocolate.

Now is the time to colour the chocolate. Use oil soluble colour and a hand blender if required to add the sufficient colour hue to your chocolate.

You can now use the tempered chocolate for dipping, drizzling, or any other application. Be sure to work quickly, as the chocolate will begin to set as it cools.

For the garnish for the explosive cake, transfer the chocolate onto a sheet of acetate and use a palette knife to evenly spread the chocolate thinly onto the surface. Leave the chocolate to just set, almost tacky still and then take a ruler and paring knife, score chocolate squares 2 cm X 2cm. Turn the sheet of acetate over and allow crystallisation.

If the chocolate starts to thicken or set while you are working with it, you can warm it up again in the double boiler for a few seconds until it is fluid again.

Once you have finished working with the chocolate, allow it to set at room temperature until it is completely hardened. Then, use a sharp knife or your hands to break it into pieces, and store it in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.

Use a palette knife to remove the chocolate garnish from the acetate and place onto the cake.

 

1
0 hours 0 minutes

Begin by setting up a double boiler. Fill a pot or saucepan with a few inches of water and bring it to a simmer over medium heat.

Place the heat-proof bowl on top of the pot, making sure that the bottom of the bowl does not touch the water. Add the chopped white chocolate to the bowl and stir gently with a spatula until the chocolate is melted and smooth.

Remove the bowl from the pot and dry the bottom with a kitchen towel. Take the temperature of the chocolate with a candy thermometer and record the temperature.

To begin tempering, you will need to cool the chocolate. You can do this by adding 1/3 of unmelted white chocolate to the melted chocolate and stirring until it has melted. Repeat this process twice, adding more unmelted white chocolate each time, until the chocolate has cooled to around 80°F (27°C).

Now it's time to warm the chocolate back up to its working temperature. Place the bowl back over the simmering water and heat the chocolate to around 86°F (30°C), stirring frequently with the spatula. Be careful not to let the temperature go above 91°F (33°C), or the chocolate will lose its temper.

Once the chocolate has reached its working temperature, remove the bowl from the heat and wipe the bottom of the bowl with a kitchen towel to prevent any water droplets from getting into the chocolate.

Now is the time to colour the chocolate. Use oil soluble colour and a hand blender if required to add the sufficient colour hue to your chocolate.

You can now use the tempered chocolate for dipping, drizzling, or any other application. Be sure to work quickly, as the chocolate will begin to set as it cools.

For the garnish for the explosive cake, transfer the chocolate onto a sheet of acetate and use a palette knife to evenly spread the chocolate thinly onto the surface. Leave the chocolate to just set, almost tacky still and then take a ruler and paring knife, score chocolate squares 2 cm X 2cm. Turn the sheet of acetate over and allow crystallisation.

If the chocolate starts to thicken or set while you are working with it, you can warm it up again in the double boiler for a few seconds until it is fluid again.

Once you have finished working with the chocolate, allow it to set at room temperature until it is completely hardened. Then, use a sharp knife or your hands to break it into pieces, and store it in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.

Use a palette knife to remove the chocolate garnish from the acetate and place onto the cake.

Recipe Tags chocolate, techniques